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a network for developers and users of imaging and analysis tools

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Welcome to IMAGES

Cambridge is home to a wealth of scientific research which includes developing tools for acquisition, visualization, processing and analysis of images. The IMAGES network brings together leading academics from all six Schools, international experts and research-led industries which work on pioneering imaging technologies and analytical algorithms. We aim to stimulate new inquiries and focused dialogues between the sciences, arts and humanities by providing them with a platform for communication.

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The Forum is open

We opened a forum to allow you to discuss about various topics. Here are the categories: Need advice about... / Collaboration offers / Share ideas / Questions about the website / Other topics... Note: a raven account is required to post messages.

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PhD Position - MRC Cancer Unit

Nov 20, 2015

Oncogene-Induced Remodelling of Cellular Networks: A Systems Biology Approach Using Optogenetics and Next-Generation Microscopy

Imaging: interpreting the seen and discovering the unseen

Feb 02, 2015

Horizon Magazine February 2015. From visualising microscopic cells to massive galaxies, imaging is a core tool for many disciplines, and it’s also the basis of a surge in recent technical developments – some of which are being pioneered in Cambridge. Today, we begin a month-long focus on research that is exploring far beyond what the eye can see, introduced here by Stella Panayotova, Stefanie Reichelt and Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb.

Using microscopy to systematically catalogue gene functions

Nov 06, 2014

Classical genetics has typically focused on dissecting how genes or pathways control a given process within cells. However, many genes likely play roles in multiple processes, which are potentially linked to one another. Unravelling those multiple roles and links is a pressing challenge if we are to understand how healthy cells function normally as integrated systems and, conversely, how complex cellular pathologies arise in disease and how to fix them.

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